Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a key operator and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A key operator controls or operates a machine and is assigned to a particular machine to which he has operating expertise. He/she ensures that the machine is operating efficiently by making sure there are enough supplies and doing minor repairs such as clearing paper jams as well as regular maintenance and cleaning.

Other than ensuring that the machine is running efficiently, other duties include receiving communication regarding the machine, determining that if the machine needs refilling of supplies, ordering supplies, determining the use patterns of the machine to prevent misuse, manage operational costs by devising control measures and storing the supplies.

Core Skills Required to be a Key Operator

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A key operator should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Cooperation with colleagues:

Cooperation is the process of working with groups or teams for a common mutual benefit as opposed to working in competition or for selfish ambition.

A Key Operator should learn the art of creating a mutually beneficial exchange among the employees that dwells much on cooperation for the same mutual benefit with adequate resources for all to use rather than creating a spirit of competition.

Dedication to Work:

Dedication to Work is a devotion or setting aside the scheduled time that you are required to work each day consistently without fail as well as being on time and giving 100% of your efforts to doing quality work.

A Key Operator ought to be dependable and set an example for the rest of the workforce by showing up for work on time every day consistently and producing quality work while applying company policies and business strategies.

Assertiveness:

Assertiveness is the inclination to stand up for your rights or other people's rights in a calm and concrete way without being aggressive or accepting a wrong.

A Key Operator must be self-assured and confident to master the skills to put his points across without upsetting others or becoming angry and allowing the employees to do the same while complying with the company's policies and procedures.

Handling Stress:

Handling Stress is the skill to balance the requirements of the job and your abilities or available resources in performing it.

A Key Operator needs to creatively learn how to schedule work according to the abilities of different individuals to ensure a balance that will not put an unsustainable level of pressure on the employees and cause them to accumulate work related stress.

Persistence:

Persistence is the refusal to give up or let go of a firm or obstinate continuous course of action despite difficulties or opposition that you may face.

A Key Operator should strongly emphasize the need for persistence as the fundamental difference between a successful outcome and a failed one while developing this important quality in each creating happy employees and business.

Self-Discipline and Sense of Duty:

Self-Discipline and Sense of Duty is an active effort which helps in developing set ways for your thoughts, actions, and habits empowering your to stick to your decisions.

A Key Operator needs to learn the secret of fostering the development of self-discipline amongst the employees by clearly defining the expectations, staying in sync with the work related events and propagate result yielding ideas that employees suggest.

Business Etiquette:

Business Etiquette is a basic framework of rules set by companies to ensure and allow you to understand the way you should conduct yourself in the professional world.

A Key Operator must establish the tone for proper behavior in the workplace by making sure all the distinct boundaries are laid out for everyone to follow and understand the implications of defaulting.

Diversity Awareness:

Diversity Awareness is the understanding that people are different and unique in their particular way and respecting their uniqueness.

A Key Operator ought to successfully identify the various types of diversity presented in his company to be able to benefit from these individual differences in the hope of improving the success of his team and encourage the team members to become aware of these qualities and use them appropriately.

Technology Savvy:

Technology Savvy is the introduction of the digital technology in the workplace as a strategy to make tasks run swiftly against doing them manually.

A Key Operator must ensure that the technology he introduces to the workplace integrated seamlessly with the workflow and empowers the users rather than complicates and damages the workflow making sure the employees are well prepared and not overwhelmed with the technology.

Mechanical Skills:

Mechanical Skills are the abilities to solve problems that arise in the workplace, although it may vary from one company to another.

A Key Operator must be well equipped with technical skills to handle any underlying mechanical problem that may arise from wrong scheduling to meeting unique customer needs, budget, legal constraints, environmental and social issues, technology changes and any other management requirements.

Hard Skills Required to be a Key Operator

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A key operator should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Key Operator: Hard skills list

Accounting
Administer Public Policies and Laws
Administrative Services Policies and Procedures
Advertising Promotions
Benefit Plans
Bookkeeping
Budget Management
Budgeting
Budgeting Principles
Business Contracts
Business Process Improvement
Business Process Outsourcing (BPO)
Cross-functional Team Leadership
Conduct Employment Interviews
Compensation Plans
Cost Analysis Theory
Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
Customer Service
Delivery and Production Schedules
Design and Plan Production
Disciplinary Practices in Supervision
Economic Principles and Trends
Effective Time Management Techniques
Employee Bargaining Agreements
Employee Policies and Standards
Evaluate Degree of Financial Risk
Facility Management Techniques
Financial Management Principles and Theories
General Financial Analysis
Human Resources
Inventory Management
Labor and Employment Regulations
Marketing Strategy
Management
Manage Contracts
Manage Daily Operations
Manage Personnel and Human Resources
Management System and Guidelines
Mathematical Principles
Meet Deadlines
Microsoft Excel
Microsoft Office
Negotiate Labor Agreements
Negotiation Techniques as Management Tool
Office Operations and Programs
Operations Management
Operations Research
Organizational Theory
Pricing Strategy
Principles of Business Law
Principles of Office Technology in Management
Project Management
Project or Bid Proposals
Project Management Techniques
Public Administration Principles
Revenue Forecasts
Safe Work Environment
Sales
Sales Management
Six Sigma
Scheduling
Supply Chain Management
Staffing Plan
Strategic and Tactical planning
Statistical Cost Estimation Methods
Supervise Employees
System Management
Vendor Management

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