Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as an interiors architect and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

An Interiors Architect is responsible for designing the interiors which require both the functionality and the appearance of space. Though grouped together with the interior decorations, this role takes on a bigger task than when making a simple room.

The primary duties include specializing in designing and building interiors for safety and functionality, understanding the durability and strength of building materials, drafting plans for creating and refinishing spaces for both private homes and commercial buildings, Interacting with different clients, architects or designers, construction team and inspectors, creating projects while taking into consideration the interior construction, lighting and furnishings, understanding of the federal, state and local building regulations.

Core Skills Required to be an Interiors Architect

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

An interiors architect should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Organized Workplace:

Organized Workplace is a vital characteristic that helps the business to thrive for long term due to the sense of structure and order which efficiently promotes the team spirit.

An Interiors Architect must be organized in the general organizing, planning, communication, time management, scheduling, coordinating resources and meeting deadlines to support the staff in being well structured and run the company successfully.

Critical Thinking:

Critical Thinking is the ability to think clearly and rationally while understanding the logical connection between ideas in a reflective and independent thinking.

An Interiors Architect will always seek to determine whether the ideas, arguments and findings do represent the entire picture while identifying, analyzing and solving problems by deducing consequences from what he knows and making use of the information gathered.

Facilitation:

Facilitation is making tasks or life easy for others while ensuring the daily running of successful meetings or workshops or business at large.

An Interiors Architect must use facilitation to process and structure a system that meets the needs of either an individual or a team to help them achieve their goals as well as add value to their lives by making sure each participates.

Appearance and Grooming:

Appearance and Grooming are the way one presents themselves in a professional environment or the workplace with the aim of gaining positive impression and respect as well.

An Interiors Architect must be an example in proper grooming and professional appearance while ensuring all the workmates adhere to the basic guidelines presented for good grooming in the workplace that represents the company wherever they go.

Creativity:

Creativity is the skill of turning new and imaginative ideas into reality through the ability to perceive the world in new ways, find hidden patterns, make connections between unrelated phenomena and generate solutions.

An Interiors Architect should be able to think, then reproduce ideas and act on them to bring awareness of what was currently hidden and point to a new life that will progress the business to new heights.

Equal Opportunity and Diversity:

Equal Opportunity and Diversity means having employees from a wide range of background that includes different ages, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious belief, educational background, physical ability and treating them equally.

An Interiors Architect is required by the law to create a workplace free from discrimination and harassment to its employees as well as understand and adhere to the rights and responsibilities under the human rights and antidiscrimination law.

Flexibility:

Flexibility is an important skill that allows employers and employees to make an arrangement about working on maintaining a work/life balance to help organizations improve the productivity and efficiency of their balance.

An Interiors Architect needs creative ideas on how to plan flexible schedules for all his employees by incorporating flexible working arrangements and individual flexibility agreements that allow negotiation to change how certain agreements apply to them and how they can be adjusted.

Enthusiasm:

Enthusiasm is an intense enjoyment or a lively interest in a certain thing with a zest and a strong belief that can be felt by those around you.

An Interiors Architect ought to be enthusiastic as well as create a friendly atmosphere that makes the staff comfortable with the surroundings, with the other employees to create a less passive working place.

Personal Drive:

Personal Drive is a combination of desire and energy in its simplest form directed at achieving a goal in whatever you have set your heart to accomplish.

An Interiors Architect needs to creatively design ways that drive the staff to carry out their work without wasting time by helping them understand and develop their self-motivation skills that assist them to take control of many different viewpoints of their life.

Role Awareness:

Role Awareness is the ability to be informed of your role in a given environment as well as understand the expectations placed on a position and to see how they are met apparently.

An Interiors Architect must assess, measure and quantify his employee's awareness of their roles to see if they are transparent about what is required of each of them and review what kind of results they are delivering from their understanding.

Hard Skills Required to be an Interiors Architect

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

An interiors architect should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Interiors Architect: Hard skills list

Abstraction
Analysis
Architectural Codes
Architectural Rendering
AutoCAD
Budgeting
Building Codes
Building Construction
Building Systems
Calculations
Client Relations
Collaboration
Communication
Computer Aided Design (CAD)
Computer Processing
Conceptualization
Construction Administration
Construction Documents
Critical Assessment
Design
Design Concepts
Design to Delivery
Development
Documents
Drafting
Drawing
Estimating
Finance
Industrial Design
Innovation
Installation
Integration
Interpersonal
Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED)
Legal
Management
Mathematics
Model Making
New Construction
Planning
Production
Project Management
Rehabilitation
Renovation
Research
Residential
Retail
Revit
Sawing
Scheduling
Seeing Big Picture Results
Slicing
Software
Solving Complex Problems
Sustainable Design
Specifications
Technical Vision
Visualize
Writing
Zoning Codes

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