Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a fuel manager and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A fuel manager is liable for managing all aspects of the fuel offered at the store level and executing all fuel programs in compliance with corporate and regulatory guidelines. This position is also liable for maintaining a safe, clean and customer focused fuel environment at all times.

The principal duties of this post includes ensuring a pleasant shopping experience for all customers, responding to customer complaints or enquiries, soliciting customer feedback, input and information through various communication vehicles, ensuring that there is a 24/7 execution of fuel operations at store-level including product handling, supplies ordering and pricing compliance, managing training and coaching for all fuel services, coordinating daily fuel operations assignments and activities of associates.

Core Skills Required to be a Fuel Manager

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A fuel manager should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Judgment Skills:

Judgment is the ability to make a decision or form an opinion wisely especially in matters affecting action, good sense and discretion.

A Fuel Manager must be a person of good judgment with the ability to make the right decision at the right time and for right reasons especially in prioritizing the work correctly to focus on a few important things and ensure excellent results are delivered.

Initiative:

An initiative is the ability to assess and initiate things independently often done without any managerial influence offered.

A Fuel Manager must train his workers to take up tasks without being asked to and work on them without being supervised to a quality that is accepted by the company, therefore nurturing a skill that grows the individual and the group as well.

Orientation to Work:

Orientation to Work is the introduction that is given to a new worker whereby he is introduced to coworkers and given relevant information like schedules, performance standards, benefits and facilities, names of the supervisors, etc.

A Fuel Manager must ensure that all new employees go through an orientation process to assimilate into the workplace and become familiar with what is expected of them.

Personal Growth:

Personal Growth is the improvement of one's awareness, identity, developing talents and potential to facilitate the growth of oneself and the position they handle at the workplace.

A Fuel Manager ought to assist his employees in finding themselves by introducing or referring them to methods, programs, tools, techniques and assessment systems that support their development at the individual level in the organization.

People Reading:

People Reading is the ability to creatively and quietly read the important non-verbal intuitive cues that people give off without their knowledge.

A Fuel Manager must be willing to surrender any preconceptions or emotional baggage like old resentments or ego clashes that may stop you from seeing someone clearly as they truly are to remain objective and receive information without distorting it.

Realistic Goal Setting:

Realistic Goal Setting is the skill to hone in the specific actions that we need to perform to accomplish everything we aspire to live.

A Fuel Manager should invest his time in planning and set both short and long-term goals that stretch and initiates the growth in every employee causing each to perform at his level best bringing in real benefit to their life and the business as well.

Results Orientation:

Results Orientation is knowing and focusing on outstanding results and working hard to achieve them because they are significant.

A Fuel Manager must understand and make it clear to the employees how important results are and the competitive and results driven market that the company is facing while encouraging them to remain focused on the results that every project bears without fail.

Cost Cutting:

Cost Cutting is the ability to reduce costs or workplace expenses that may be excess costs that can be limited.

A Fuel Manager should come up with cost-cutting tactics that will earn the company a better revenue even if they aren't massive; it will teach employees also to be reserved with every dollar that simply goes into the enterprise.

Quality Management:

Quality Management is the management approach to the long-term success through customer satisfaction that directly involves the employees in the continual improvement of the daily tasks.

A Fuel Manager should consider the quality management earnestly for the success of the business by improving the processes, products, services, the discipline and the culture in which they work under to warrant the improvement of profitability and productivity.

Intercultural Competence:

Intercultural Competence is the knowledge and skills to successfully interact with people from other ethnic, religious, cultural, national and geographic groups.

A Fuel Manager should have a high degree of intercultural competence that enables him to have successful interactions with people from different groups as well as train his employees to be sensitive to the cultural differences and be willing to modify their behavior as a sign of respect for each other.

Hard Skills Required to be a Fuel Manager

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A fuel manager should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Fuel Manager: Hard skills list

Administration and Management
Analytical
Building and Construction
Chemistry
Controlling Quality
Design
Engineering
Equipment Maintenance
Equipment Selection
Mathematics
Maintaining Equipment
Mechanical
Monitoring Equipment
Monitoring Performance
Operating Equipment
Operation Monitoring
Operation and Control
Physics
Production and Processing
Public Safety and Security
Quality Control Analysis
Repairing
Speaking
Systems Analysis
Systems Evaluation
Technical
Technology
Troubleshooting
Writing
Verbal Communication

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