Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as an information security auditor and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

An Information Security Auditor is responsible for safeguarding the information systems assets by identifying and solving potential and actual security problems. This position also ensures that the audited systems remain secure in the company.

Essential duties for this position include protecting the systems by defining access privileges, control structures, and resources, recognizing problems through identifying abnormalities and reporting violations, implementing security improvements by assessing current situation, evaluating trends, anticipating requirements, determining safety violations and inefficiencies by conducting periodic audits, upgrading system by implementing and maintaining security controls, maintaining quality service by following organization standards, keeping users informed by preparing performance reports, maintains a technical knowledge by attending educational workshops.

Core Skills Required to be an Information Security Auditor

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

An information security auditor should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Verbal Communication:

Verbal Communication is the use of tones and language to relay a message; it aids as a vehicle for expressing ideas, concepts and it, is critical to the daily running of the business.

An Information Security Auditor portrays his/her image and that of the company by the way he/she communicates; strong verbal communication skills are vital for business development and forging lasting relationships with customers, suppliers, and colleagues.

Phone Skills:

Phone Skills are useful to present a professional company image through the telephone to the customers while making them feel well informed and appreciated without necessarily seeing their faces.

An Information Security Auditor is required to master and project an enthusiastic natural tone to make both the customers and staff feel comfortable during the conversation while creating room for a productive and friendly exchange.

Dealing with Difficult People:

Dealing with Difficult People is learning how to tactfully calm down an obnoxious person who is either verbally attacking you or stealthily criticizing you or your professional contribution.

An Information Security Auditor must learn how to combat and tone the demanding customers or staff who are competing for power, privilege or spotlight which defy logic not with fights but with the truth and more listening skills as well as lots of patience.

Potential for Advancement:

The potential for Advancement is the ability to make something better by being more skillful, more efficient, and more useful to produce high-quality results.

An Information Security Auditor needs to invest in his employees by creating room for individual advancement that encourages stronger job performance because it positions the employees to demonstrate just how well they can perform their jobs through motivation and feedback that are critical to the employee performance.

Handling Stress:

Handling Stress is the skill to balance the requirements of the job and your abilities or available resources in performing it.

An Information Security Auditor needs to creatively learn how to schedule work according to the abilities of different individuals to ensure a balance that will not put an unsustainable level of pressure on the employees and cause them to accumulate work related stress.

Quality Management:

Quality Management is the management approach to the long-term success through customer satisfaction that directly involves the employees in the continual improvement of the daily tasks.

An Information Security Auditor should consider the quality management earnestly for the success of the business by improving the processes, products, services, the discipline and the culture in which they work under to warrant the improvement of profitability and productivity.

Business Etiquette:

Business Etiquette is a basic framework of rules set by companies to ensure and allow you to understand the way you should conduct yourself in the professional world.

An Information Security Auditor must establish the tone for proper behavior in the workplace by making sure all the distinct boundaries are laid out for everyone to follow and understand the implications of defaulting.

Business Trend Awareness:

Business Trend Awareness is the capacity to be conscious of the changing ways in which the companies are developing in the marketplace.

An Information Security Auditor should have the required knowledge of new business trends that he can instigate or follow and the understanding of how they are impacting the business decisions which will eventually bring success to the employees as well as the enterprise

Customer Service:

Customer Service is the ability to cater for the needs of the client by providing excellent customer service without compromise.

An Information Security Auditor must understand that pleasing customers is directly connected to the success of the business, therefore, must create a superior customer experience culture in the company that every employee should follow in ensuring all the customers are treated as they should.

Technology Trend Awareness:

Technology Trend Awareness is staying updated with the useful upcoming trends that can serve your business better and easier.

An Information Security Auditor must be able to look back at the setbacks and success of the company and consider new possibilities for the future by the use of technology looking for a better, faster, more practical approach that can make business more productive.

Hard Skills Required to be an Information Security Auditor

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

An information security auditor should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Information Security Auditor: Hard skills list

Accounting
Administration
Auditing
Bookkeeping
Business Acumen
Clerical
Computers and Electronics
Corporate Finance
Customer and Personal Service
Data Interrogation
Data Mining and Analytics
Documentation
Economics
Ethical
Financial
Financial Software
Fraud Auditing
Finance
Forensic
Information Security Management
IT
Industry-Specific Knowledge
Information Technology
Internal Auditing
Interpersonal
Investigation
Legal Compliance
Legal Knowledge
Marketing
Mathematics
Methodology
Occupational Health and Safety Management
Presentation
Quality Controls
Quality Management
Reporting
Reporting Research Results
Risk and Compliance Expertise
Risk Management Assurance
Sales
Security, Emergency, and Continuity Management
SFAS Rules
Statistics
Technical
Theory
Transportation Safety Management
Writing

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