Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a forensic psychologist and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A Forensic Psychologist is tasked with the role of providing psychological expertise when required to do so by a court of law during a case investigation. They are tasked with applying psychological knowledge on matters to do with laws and legal systems. He /she can also get to perform counseling sessions to victims.

Besides that primary role, he/she can be tasked with other functions like developing psychological profiles of suspects in collaboration with law enforcement agencies, administering polygraph test to various crime suspects, evaluate court testimonies given by eyewitnesses, assessing the mental state of criminal suspects before legal proceedings, and conducting their own research and reporting findings to a court of law.

Core Skills Required to be a Forensic Psychologist

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A forensic psychologist should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Negotiation Skills:

Negotiation Skills are a deliberative process by which people settle their differences through an acceptable agreement to both parties to co-exist without argument and dispute in the workplace.

A Forensic Psychologist must learn to resolve any disputes that arise in the workplace using the principles of fairness, seeking mutual benefit and maintaining a cordial relationship that builds a success at the workplace.

Multi-Tasking:

Multi-Tasking allows one to juggle and perform more than one task at a time without losing track of what you are working on or dropping the ball.

A Forensic Psychologist must learn the trick of multitasking and help the staff balance the competing demands of their time and energy that they are expected to handle multiple priorities every day without compromising on the effectiveness of the work done.

Collaborating with others:

Collaborating is willingly working with one another and cooperating in whatever task one is assigned without behaving poorly or having an attitude change that hurts others.

A Forensic Psychologist is meant to collaborate with all workers and management both male and female without causing frustrations or sidelining any worker or delaying their promotion from any informal conversations where most decisions are often made.

Delegation:

Delegation is assigning responsibility or authority to another person a junior or subordinate to carry out specific activities while remaining accountable for the outcome.

A Forensic Psychologist must be equipped with skills on how to make the delegation work correctly to save the organization time and money and to allow the subordinate make wise decisions, skills, and motivation to become better and grow the company.

Planning and Scheduling:

Planning and Scheduling are the act of establishing a plan for a set of tasks that needs to be completed and including when they should be done.

A Forensic Psychologist needs creativity in balancing both planning and scheduling by clearing defining what and how activities will be carried out by when and who in particular to ensure there are a clear flow and accountability to every staff.

Evaluating Others:

Evaluating others is the capacity to see the individuality in others and recognize a person's unique point of view.

A Forensic Psychologist must master the skills of evaluating others to help his staff members to identify their talents and match those talents to the proper job without trying to judge them by their actions that can create a misinterpretation of who they are.

Persuading Others:

Persuading others is making sure your best ideas get a fair hearing without manipulating others or using trickery.

A Forensic Psychologist needs to creatively learn how to introduce new ideas that will boost growth for the company without managing the staff or put them under pressure with more work but with manageable goals that the employees will delight working on and grow as they do.

Quality of Work:

The quality of Work is the value of work or products produced by the employees as well as the work environment they are provided with.

A Forensic Psychologist needs creativity in assisting all teams in identifying characteristics that will result in a quality product and lead to greater efficiency and increased productivity by following the four critical outcomes of employee retention, customer satisfaction, profitability, and productivity.

Training others:

Training is the ability to expand the knowledge base by learning new truths that are useful in the workplace.

A Forensic Psychologist needs to creatively schedule training for his employees in a focused manner that will allow the employee stay useful in the workplace and get new knowledge so that both the business and the worker not suffer from delays and work related stress.

Analytical Skills:

Analytical Skills is the ability to collect and analyze information, solve problems and make decisions according to the policies and regulations of the business.

A Forensic Psychologist should hire employees who use clear, logical steps and excellent judgment to understand an issue from all angles before executing an action depending on the objective and the methodical approaches to benefit a company's productivity.

Hard Skills Required to be a Forensic Psychologist

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A forensic psychologist should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Forensic Psychologist: Hard skills list

Active Listening Techniques
Childhood development theories
Clinical Psychology
Clinical Research
Clinical Supervision
Social Trend Awareness
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
Cognition theory
Confidentiality procedures
Counseling Psychology
Counseling techniques
Cultural and ethnic diversity theory
Cultural and religious awareness
Current social research
Family Therapy
Forensic Psychology
Grief counseling techniques
Group psychology principles
Information
Interpret psychological test results
Interviewing Techniques
Investigations and research
Line Search Techniques
Mediation techniques
Mental Health
Principles of Group Dynamics
Psychoanalysis
Psychology
Psychological Assessment tools
Psychological Testing
Psychological Treatment techniques
Psychology Theory
Psychotherapy
Social statistics
Statistical methods
Teaching techniques
Working With Adolescents

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