Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a chemist and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A chemist conducts chemical analysis in a laboratory to control quality or processes or to come up with new knowledge or products. He/she analyses the chemical compounds of substances, tests the quality of products and prepares solutions and compounds for testing as well as maintaining the laboratory equipment to proper working condition.

Other duties include developing and implementing new analytical methods to meet the changing needs of the laboratory; assisting or training laboratory staff on particular methods and procedures; ensuring that samples are in proper custody; evaluating laboratory results by applying quality control procedures; maintaining records; preparing lab reports to describe analysis procedures and develop new methods products or methods of production.

Core Skills Required to be a Chemist

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A chemist should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Troubleshooting:

Troubleshooting is solving a problem or determining a question to an issue which is often applied to repairing failed products or processes on a machine or a system.

A Chemist must be able to diagnose any trouble in the management flow caused by a failure of any kind and determine to remedy the causes of the symptoms with the final product being the confirmation that the solution restores the process to an excellent working state.

Knowledge of Job:

Knowledge of Job is essential to every employee who needs to have a clear understanding of how their jobs fit into the overall organization to eliminate carelessness and laxity.

A Chemist must be able to evaluate this criterion when selecting an employee and know the common descriptions of a person with either right or inadequate knowledge of the job early enough to either keep them or let them go.

Supervisory Skills:

Supervisory Skills is the ability to lead and manage people effectively in a difficult and challenging atmosphere in the day to day life.

A Chemist must cultivate, develop and refine management and supervisory skills to strengthen the present as well as build the future of the business by becoming competent in such roles like problem-solving, communication, managing people, time management, leadership, planning, etc.

Cooperation with colleagues:

Cooperation is the process of working with groups or teams for a common mutual benefit as opposed to working in competition or for selfish ambition.

A Chemist should learn the art of creating a mutually beneficial exchange among the employees that dwells much on cooperation for the same mutual benefit with adequate resources for all to use rather than creating a spirit of competition.

Self Awareness:

Self Awareness is the ability to have a sound understanding of who you are as a person and how to relate to the world in which you live by understanding your strengths and weaknesses and how to manage them in the workplace.

A Chemist must creatively know how to administer the workforce diversity by understanding the culture identity, biases, and stereotypes and become more aware on how he reflects his thoughts, feelings, and behavior towards the staff.

Following Directions:

Following Directions is the skill of carefully considering the given instructions and following them closely without fail.

A Chemist must ensure that his workers are paying attention and listening to instructions provided as well as taking careful steps in doing what they are supposed to do and understand what it means to the business and bring satisfaction to their superiors.

Personal Drive:

Personal Drive is a combination of desire and energy in its simplest form directed at achieving a goal in whatever you have set your heart to accomplish.

A Chemist needs to creatively design ways that drive the staff to carry out their work without wasting time by helping them understand and develop their self-motivation skills that assist them to take control of many different viewpoints of their life.

Self-Discipline and Sense of Duty:

Self-Discipline and Sense of Duty is an active effort which helps in developing set ways for your thoughts, actions, and habits empowering your to stick to your decisions.

A Chemist needs to learn the secret of fostering the development of self-discipline amongst the employees by clearly defining the expectations, staying in sync with the work related events and propagate result yielding ideas that employees suggest.

Business Ethics:

Business Ethics is the ability to learn what is right and wrong in the world of business and choosing to do what is right at all times.

A Chemist must emulate good business ethic that is essential for the long-term success of an organization by implementing an ethical program that will foster a thriving entrepreneurial culture while increasing profitability and personal maturity.

Technology Savvy:

Technology Savvy is the introduction of the digital technology in the workplace as a strategy to make tasks run swiftly against doing them manually.

A Chemist must ensure that the technology he introduces to the workplace integrated seamlessly with the workflow and empowers the users rather than complicates and damages the workflow making sure the employees are well prepared and not overwhelmed with the technology.

Hard Skills Required to be a Chemist

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A chemist should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Chemist: Hard skills list

Aptitude for and Interest in Chemistry
Analytical and Problem-Solving
Budgeting
Chemistry
Commercial and business awareness
Computer Savvy
Communication
Cost-effective production methods
Equipment inspection
Estimating production costs
Interpersonal
IT
Finance
Heat Transfer
Hydraulics
Designing Plant and Equipment Configuration
Designing, Installing and Commissioning New Production Plants
Distillation
MS Excel
Mass & Energy balances
Material and Energy Balance
Mathematics
Monitoring and Optimizing the Performance of Production Processes
Operations Analysis
Operation And Control
Optimizing Production
Oral and Written Communication
Planning
Practical aptitude
Principles from Economics, Biochemistry, Statistics and Material Science
Process Control
Project Management
Quality Control Analysis
Researching and Developing Products
Resource Management
Researching New Products
Setting Up Scale-up and Scale-down Processes
Science
Systems Evaluation
System Analysis and Synthesis Techniques
Technology Design
Technical Sales
Time Management
Troubleshooting
Understanding of Engineering Principles and Mathematics

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