Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a processing clerk and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A Processing Clerk is responsible for assisting businesses to fulfill product and service orders every time the consumers make purchases.

The duties for this role include interacting daily with customers, answering queries, building lasting relationships with clients, answer calls and collect order information, taking orders, using database to check the availability of products, checking shipping details that include mailing addresses and estimated delivery dates, ensuring all the requested items are involved in the shipment before it is sent to the customer, providing the requested merchandise is moved from the warehouse to the distribution delivery area, communicating with the inventory clerks, notifying them of any unusually large orders.

Core Skills Required to be a Processing Clerk

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A processing clerk should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Customer Oriented:

Customer Oriented is a skill that focuses primarily on the client as the King offering quality services that meet the customer's expectations with an aim to inspire people rather than just try to sell their product.

A Processing Clerk needs to be customer oriented to boost the image of their company, stand out from the rest of the people and devise innovations of tomorrow that focus its sights on a new target ? satisfying the customer expectations.

Verbal Communication:

Verbal Communication is the use of tones and language to relay a message; it aids as a vehicle for expressing ideas, concepts and it, is critical to the daily running of the business.

A Processing Clerk portrays his/her image and that of the company by the way he/she communicates; strong verbal communication skills are vital for business development and forging lasting relationships with customers, suppliers, and colleagues.

Negotiation Skills:

Negotiation Skills are a deliberative process by which people settle their differences through an acceptable agreement to both parties to co-exist without argument and dispute in the workplace.

A Processing Clerk must learn to resolve any disputes that arise in the workplace using the principles of fairness, seeking mutual benefit and maintaining a cordial relationship that builds a success at the workplace.

Phone Skills:

Phone Skills are useful to present a professional company image through the telephone to the customers while making them feel well informed and appreciated without necessarily seeing their faces.

A Processing Clerk is required to master and project an enthusiastic natural tone to make both the customers and staff feel comfortable during the conversation while creating room for a productive and friendly exchange.

Collaborating with others:

Collaborating is willingly working with one another and cooperating in whatever task one is assigned without behaving poorly or having an attitude change that hurts others.

A Processing Clerk is meant to collaborate with all workers and management both male and female without causing frustrations or sidelining any worker or delaying their promotion from any informal conversations where most decisions are often made.

Cooperation with colleagues:

Cooperation is the process of working with groups or teams for a common mutual benefit as opposed to working in competition or for selfish ambition.

A Processing Clerk should learn the art of creating a mutually beneficial exchange among the employees that dwells much on cooperation for the same mutual benefit with adequate resources for all to use rather than creating a spirit of competition.

Following Directions:

Following Directions is the skill of carefully considering the given instructions and following them closely without fail.

A Processing Clerk must ensure that his workers are paying attention and listening to instructions provided as well as taking careful steps in doing what they are supposed to do and understand what it means to the business and bring satisfaction to their superiors.

Customer Service:

Customer Service is the ability to cater for the needs of the client by providing excellent customer service without compromise.

A Processing Clerk must understand that pleasing customers is directly connected to the success of the business, therefore, must create a superior customer experience culture in the company that every employee should follow in ensuring all the customers are treated as they should.

Scheduling:

Scheduling is creating daily workflow charts that the employees are supposed to follow when working and submitting their projects.

A Processing Clerk must be dedicated to establishing and maintaining the schedule using either manual or technology methods to ensure it is always updated according to the tasks, the employees responsible or the time allocated to each task without fail or delay.

Product Knowledge:

Product Knowledge is an essential sales skill to understand the features of your product allowing you to present the benefits compellingly and accurately to the customer.

A Processing Clerk should ensure the teams understand the company's goods or services and can quickly take a client through them, therefore, instilling faith, trust and respect in the customers which in turn creates a positive customer experience.

Hard Skills Required to be a Processing Clerk

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A processing clerk should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Processing Clerk: Hard skills list

Accounting
Accounting Principles
Accounting Principles and Practices
Administrative
Analysis
Banking
Business
Clerical
Computers
Computing Equity
Computing Transfer Taxes
Customer and Personal Service
Designing Forms
Distributing Dividends
Economics
Equity Transfer Taxes
Financial
Financial data
Financial Markets
MS Excel
Psychology
Reporting
Law and Government
Managing Files and Records
Mathematics
Sales
Stenography
Stock Market
Technical
Time Management
Tracking Stock Price Fluctuations
Transcription
Writing
Word Processing
World History
Verifying Stock Transactions

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