Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a process control engineer and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A process control engineer is responsible for maintaining or creating automation processes in mechanical and chemical industries. He/she ensures that processes at manufacturing plants occur as planned and helps to improve the efficiency of processes by implementing or creating new strategies as well as managing control processes.

Duties in this position include designing, testing, troubleshooting, and supervising the implementation of new processes, designing and installing retrofits in existing control systems, troubleshooting hardware and software problems in existing systems, designing and maintaining quality of the manufacturing plants? control system, take part in automating unit processing, ensuring that there are well-established process controls and to monitor the control processes find out if they need improvement.

Core Skills Required to be a Process Control Engineer

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A process control engineer should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Troubleshooting:

Troubleshooting is solving a problem or determining a question to an issue which is often applied to repairing failed products or processes on a machine or a system.

A Process Control Engineer must be able to diagnose any trouble in the management flow caused by a failure of any kind and determine to remedy the causes of the symptoms with the final product being the confirmation that the solution restores the process to an excellent working state.

Networking:

Networking is the process that encourages an exchange of information and ideas among individuals or groups that share the same interests.

A Process Control Engineer is required to establish policies and procedures that govern networking to form professional relationships that will boost the future of business and employment prospects while maintaining regular contact with each other to gain each other's trust thus developing few quality relationships.

Equal Opportunity and Diversity:

Equal Opportunity and Diversity means having employees from a wide range of background that includes different ages, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religious belief, educational background, physical ability and treating them equally.

A Process Control Engineer is required by the law to create a workplace free from discrimination and harassment to its employees as well as understand and adhere to the rights and responsibilities under the human rights and antidiscrimination law.

Competitiveness:

Competitiveness is the skill of being able to compete as a team or a company with other enterprises in the same line of entrepreneurship and emerging as the winner.

A Process Control Engineer needs creativity in setting the pace for the organization on the policies and factors that determine the level of productivity of their enterprise against their competitors leading to the growth of the business and the income.

Monitoring Others:

Monitoring others is tracking employee activities monitor the worker engagement with the workplace-related tasks.

A Process Control Engineer should always monitor his workers to measure productivity, track attendance, incoming and outgoing phone calls, safety spying, employee theft, employee's location, horseplay and collect proof of hours worked using the latest computer detective monitoring system that provides accurate data that cannot be debated.

Role Awareness:

Role Awareness is the ability to be informed of your role in a given environment as well as understand the expectations placed on a position and to see how they are met apparently.

A Process Control Engineer must assess, measure and quantify his employee's awareness of their roles to see if they are transparent about what is required of each of them and review what kind of results they are delivering from their understanding.

Seeing Potential Problems:

Seeing Potential Problems is the ability to structure the current situations and identify developments that could cause problems in the future.

A Process Control Engineer needs to see potential problems before they occur and work to stop them early enough, he also has to stay ahead of the flow not to be caught you by upcoming issues that could be easily prevented if they were noted soon enough.

Business Trend Awareness:

Business Trend Awareness is the capacity to be conscious of the changing ways in which the companies are developing in the marketplace.

A Process Control Engineer should have the required knowledge of new business trends that he can instigate or follow and the understanding of how they are impacting the business decisions which will eventually bring success to the employees as well as the enterprise

Technology Savvy:

Technology Savvy is the introduction of the digital technology in the workplace as a strategy to make tasks run swiftly against doing them manually.

A Process Control Engineer must ensure that the technology he introduces to the workplace integrated seamlessly with the workflow and empowers the users rather than complicates and damages the workflow making sure the employees are well prepared and not overwhelmed with the technology.

Mechanical Skills:

Mechanical Skills are the abilities to solve problems that arise in the workplace, although it may vary from one company to another.

A Process Control Engineer must be well equipped with technical skills to handle any underlying mechanical problem that may arise from wrong scheduling to meeting unique customer needs, budget, legal constraints, environmental and social issues, technology changes and any other management requirements.

Hard Skills Required to be a Process Control Engineer

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A process control engineer should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Process Control Engineer: Hard skills list

Aptitude for and Interest in Chemistry
Analytical and Problem-Solving
Budgeting
Chemistry
Commercial and business awareness
Computer Savvy
Communication
Cost-effective production methods
Equipment inspection
Estimating production costs
Interpersonal
IT
Finance
Heat Transfer
Hydraulics
Designing Plant and Equipment Configuration
Designing, Installing and Commissioning New Production Plants
Distillation
MS Excel
Mass & Energy balances
Material and Energy Balance
Mathematics
Monitoring and Optimizing the Performance of Production Processes
Operations Analysis
Operation And Control
Optimizing Production
Oral and Written Communication
Planning
Practical aptitude
Principles from Economics, Biochemistry, Statistics and Material Science
Process Control
Project Management
Quality Control Analysis
Researching and Developing Products
Resource Management
Researching New Products
Setting Up Scale-up and Scale-down Processes
Science
Systems Evaluation
System Analysis and Synthesis Techniques
Technology Design
Technical Sales
Time Management
Troubleshooting
Understanding of Engineering Principles and Mathematics

Written by on