Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as an audiovisual archivist and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

An Audiovisual Archivist is responsible for conservation, preservation and maintaining the data of the audiovisual format like films, magnetic videos, audio tapes, optical and digital media. This role requires an individual who has specialized training and understanding of history and its importance to future generations. The Library is the most likely place for this position to be utilized, but any other organization can adopt it for easier data management. Other important tasks include creating and implementing policies and procedures for handling the stored data, managing and availing the data as required as per the company's policies, collaborating with other departments to recommend and oversee equipment and handling of the stored data, researching and following the copyright laws related to these materials, preserving and providing access to the materials stored.

Core Skills Required to be an Audiovisual Archivist

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

An audiovisual archivist should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Listening Skills:

Listening Skills are a practical ability to accurately receive and interpret messages you receive during the communication process to ensure flow and accuracy are maintained.

An Audiovisual Archivist ought to have outstanding listening skills that lead to a better understanding at the workplace between the management and the staff, customer satisfaction in return yielding greater productivity with fewer mistakes and increased sharing of information in a more creative and innovative way.

Dealing with Difficult People:

Dealing with Difficult People is learning how to tactfully calm down an obnoxious person who is either verbally attacking you or stealthily criticizing you or your professional contribution.

An Audiovisual Archivist must learn how to combat and tone the demanding customers or staff who are competing for power, privilege or spotlight which defy logic not with fights but with the truth and more listening skills as well as lots of patience.

Flexibility:

Flexibility is an important skill that allows employers and employees to make an arrangement about working on maintaining a work/life balance to help organizations improve the productivity and efficiency of their balance.

An Audiovisual Archivist needs creative ideas on how to plan flexible schedules for all his employees by incorporating flexible working arrangements and individual flexibility agreements that allow negotiation to change how certain agreements apply to them and how they can be adjusted.

Potential for Advancement:

The potential for Advancement is the ability to make something better by being more skillful, more efficient, and more useful to produce high-quality results.

An Audiovisual Archivist needs to invest in his employees by creating room for individual advancement that encourages stronger job performance because it positions the employees to demonstrate just how well they can perform their jobs through motivation and feedback that are critical to the employee performance.

Project and Goal Focus:

Project and Goal Focus is setting your mind and heart on things that matter and add value to your life against those things that add no value at all or of little value.

An Audiovisual Archivist ought to learn of early hiccups that may cause distraction and get to motivate the employees early enough to see the projects completed promptly and in good condition.

Seeing Potential Problems:

Seeing Potential Problems is the ability to structure the current situations and identify developments that could cause problems in the future.

An Audiovisual Archivist needs to see potential problems before they occur and work to stop them early enough, he also has to stay ahead of the flow not to be caught you by upcoming issues that could be easily prevented if they were noted soon enough.

Business Trend Awareness:

Business Trend Awareness is the capacity to be conscious of the changing ways in which the companies are developing in the marketplace.

An Audiovisual Archivist should have the required knowledge of new business trends that he can instigate or follow and the understanding of how they are impacting the business decisions which will eventually bring success to the employees as well as the enterprise

Process Improvement:

Process Improvement is the creation of new processes or improving the existing ones that will work and take your corporation to the next level.

An Audiovisual Archivist must maintain the continuous improvements in the workplace that are favorable to the current investors, potential investors, and stock owners while working with methods that can serve as a foundation for future business decisions causing a profitable growth.

Research:

Research is the ability to stay updated on the latest trends in different fields as per your concern or the concern of your company or business.

An Audiovisual Archivist ought to stay up to date on the latest trends in hiring, leading, retention, technology and much more by using the newest research methods that allow him to make better decisions and improve productivity.

Training others:

Training is the ability to expand the knowledge base by learning new truths that are useful in the workplace.

An Audiovisual Archivist needs to creatively schedule training for his employees in a focused manner that will allow the employee stay useful in the workplace and get new knowledge so that both the business and the worker not suffer from delays and work related stress.

Hard Skills Required to be an Audiovisual Archivist

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

An audiovisual archivist should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Audiovisual Archivist: Hard skills list

Administrative
Analysis
Analytical
Anthropology
Archeology
Clerical
Communication
Computer
Customer and Personal Service
English Language
Evaluating
Information Technology
Information Science
Jurisprudence
Law and Government
Librarian
Project management
Research
Selecting
Sociology
Technical
Time Management
Writing

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