Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as a collections management archivist and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

A Collections Management Archivist is liable for development, storage and preservation of collections and cultural heritage to satisfy the needs of the individual collector or the organization at large. This position ensures the long-term safety and sustainability of the cultural objects without fail.

Primary responsibilities include recording archival descriptions in collection management, promoting efficient processing and report to minimize backlogs, managing the life cycle of archival collections in a broad spectrum of archival functions, facilitating access to archival collections, comparing management tools and systems to find out what works best, integrating group management tools with other systems, facilitating access to archival collections through available records.

Core Skills Required to be a Collections Management Archivist

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

A collections management archivist should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Listening Skills:

Listening Skills are a practical ability to accurately receive and interpret messages you receive during the communication process to ensure flow and accuracy are maintained.

A Collections Management Archivist ought to have outstanding listening skills that lead to a better understanding at the workplace between the management and the staff, customer satisfaction in return yielding greater productivity with fewer mistakes and increased sharing of information in a more creative and innovative way.

Safety at work:

Safety is being protected from hurt or other non-desirable outcomes that may tend to overrule a situation and cause damages of different kinds.

A Collections Management Archivist must learn to keep the organization safe from different risks by developing a high sense of alertness that detects danger from afar and stops it before it causes risk, danger or injury in the organization.

Developing Others:

Developing others is an unremitting process that focuses on the broader, longer-term growth of individuals to nurture them to their potential and promote future development.

A Collections Management Archivist needs to support, coach, positively impacts and effectively aid in developing talents of their staff by motivating them to become outstanding in their behavioral change and performance improvement that opens up development opportunities in the organization.

Ethical Behavior:

Ethical Behavior is acting in policies that are consistent with what the society and individuals typically think are good morals or values.

A Collections Management Archivist should put emphasis on ethical behavior as best as he does to performance because it's as important as high morale and teamwork to all individuals who are committed to keeping the company values as well as speaking up when such costs are broken.

Empathy:

Empathy is the understanding of another person's condition from their perspective by placing yourself in their shoes and feeling what they are feeling.

A Collections Management Archivist ought to practice empathy with his staff by learning to be a good listener and understanding what his employees are going through and choosing to feel it with them through the use of imagination and accommodate them.

Conceptual Thinking:

Conceptual Thinking is the ability to recognize a situation or problem by identifying patterns or connections while addressing the underlying issues.

A Collections Management Archivist must be a conceptual thinker who has a keen understanding of why things have to be done the way they are; he has to think at an abstract level and apply his insights to the situation across all facets to compete in the diverse and growing economy.

Practical Thinking:

Practical Thinking is the skill to think creatively about projects or work that requires your full attention to be completed and to bring great results.

A Collections Management Archivist must ensure the decisions he makes are well sought after using professional characteristics for employees with high-level responsibilities to feel included and to allow growth for everyone in a constantly changing world that requires creativity.

Project and Goal Focus:

Project and Goal Focus is setting your mind and heart on things that matter and add value to your life against those things that add no value at all or of little value.

A Collections Management Archivist ought to learn of early hiccups that may cause distraction and get to motivate the employees early enough to see the projects completed promptly and in good condition.

Process Improvement:

Process Improvement is the creation of new processes or improving the existing ones that will work and take your corporation to the next level.

A Collections Management Archivist must maintain the continuous improvements in the workplace that are favorable to the current investors, potential investors, and stock owners while working with methods that can serve as a foundation for future business decisions causing a profitable growth.

Training others:

Training is the ability to expand the knowledge base by learning new truths that are useful in the workplace.

A Collections Management Archivist needs to creatively schedule training for his employees in a focused manner that will allow the employee stay useful in the workplace and get new knowledge so that both the business and the worker not suffer from delays and work related stress.

Hard Skills Required to be a Collections Management Archivist

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

A collections management archivist should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Collections Management Archivist: Hard skills list

Administrative
Analysis
Analytical
Anthropology
Archeology
Clerical
Communication
Computer
Customer and Personal Service
English Language
Evaluating
Information Technology
Information Science
Jurisprudence
Law and Government
Librarian
Project management
Research
Selecting
Sociology
Technical
Time Management
Writing

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