Find out the top 10 core skills you need to master as an information security analyst and what hard skills you need to know to succeed in this job.

An Information Security Analyst has the overall responsibility to provide computer security solutions from time to time by finding possible security threats and vulnerabilities. They are in-charge of developing security strategies and implementing them in accordance with the company's standard procedures. They make use of their advanced computer security knowledge and skill set to help undertake their role.

Besides that major responsibility, other duties include troubleshooting and remedying any possible threat and vulnerabilities, protect all computer assets, configure computer security tools and related software, monitor and review daily computer logs and traffic, offer technical support and training in relation to computer security and document all computer security threats, risks, and solutions.

Core Skills Required to be an Information Security Analyst

Core skills describe a set of non-technical abilities, knowledge, and understanding that form the basis for successful participation in the workplace. Core skills enable employees to efficiently and professionally navigate the world of work and interact with others, as well as adapt and think critically to solve problems.

Core skills are often tagged onto job descriptions to find or attract employees with specific essential core values that enable the company to remain competitive, build relationships, and improve productivity.

An information security analyst should master the following 10 core skills to fulfill her job properly.

Verbal Communication:

Verbal Communication is the use of tones and language to relay a message; it aids as a vehicle for expressing ideas, concepts and it, is critical to the daily running of the business.

An Information Security Analyst portrays his/her image and that of the company by the way he/she communicates; strong verbal communication skills are vital for business development and forging lasting relationships with customers, suppliers, and colleagues.

Negotiation Skills:

Negotiation Skills are a deliberative process by which people settle their differences through an acceptable agreement to both parties to co-exist without argument and dispute in the workplace.

An Information Security Analyst must learn to resolve any disputes that arise in the workplace using the principles of fairness, seeking mutual benefit and maintaining a cordial relationship that builds a success at the workplace.

Judgment Skills:

Judgment is the ability to make a decision or form an opinion wisely especially in matters affecting action, good sense and discretion.

An Information Security Analyst must be a person of good judgment with the ability to make the right decision at the right time and for right reasons especially in prioritizing the work correctly to focus on a few important things and ensure excellent results are delivered.

Self Confidence:

Self Confidence is the ability to know who you are and what you are capable of doing which shows in your behavior, your body language, how you speak, etc.

An Information Security Analyst must be confident enough to inspire confidence in others while encouraging them to handle daily tasks and their personal lives with self-confidence that will, in turn, produce a well-rounded individual.

Consistency and Reliability:

Consistency and Reliability are the ability to be trusted to do what you do best all the time with or without supervision and without failure to produce results.

An Information Security Analyst is liable to maintain a high level of consistency and reliability by engaging with employees and treating them with respect deserved which produces excellent results in various kinds of reliability coefficients.

Evaluating Others:

Evaluating others is the capacity to see the individuality in others and recognize a person's unique point of view.

An Information Security Analyst must master the skills of evaluating others to help his staff members to identify their talents and match those talents to the proper job without trying to judge them by their actions that can create a misinterpretation of who they are.

Personal Commitment:

Personal Commitment is an obligation that you have voluntarily agreed to fulfill without being cajoled or threatened and are willing to be held accountable for the results.

An Information Security Analyst ought to understand that though adopting new policies and procedures will be met with resistance, the approach by which safety standards are implemented and enforced influences employee's attitudes and commitment towards the organization.

Meeting Management:

Meeting Management is the skill to know and understands the reason why an official meeting should be held and who should attend.

An Information Security Analyst must learn how to properly organize and conduct meetings to contribute to organizational effectiveness by determining situations that require a meeting, understanding types of meetings, planning the meeting, running the meeting to the close and managing people after the meeting.

Technology Savvy:

Technology Savvy is the introduction of the digital technology in the workplace as a strategy to make tasks run swiftly against doing them manually.

An Information Security Analyst must ensure that the technology he introduces to the workplace integrated seamlessly with the workflow and empowers the users rather than complicates and damages the workflow making sure the employees are well prepared and not overwhelmed with the technology.

Technical Skills:

Technical Skills are the abilities and knowledge mostly related to mechanical, IT, scientific and mathematical needed to perform specific tasks in the workplace.

An Information Security Analyst ought to hire employees with particular talents and expertise that helps them perform certain duties and jobs that other skills like soft skills cannot perform to grow both the business and the employee and bring in productivity.

Hard Skills Required to be an Information Security Analyst

Hard skills are job-specific skill sets, or expertise, that are teachable and whose presence can be tested through exams. While core skills are more difficult to quantify and less tangible, hard skills are quantifiable and more defined.

Hard skills are usually listed on an applicant's resume to help recruiters know the applicant's qualifications for the applied position. A recruiter, therefore, needs to review the applicant's resume and education to find out if he/she has the knowledge necessary to get the job done.

An information security analyst should have a good command of the following hard skills to succeed in her job.

Information Security Analyst: Hard skills list

Analytical
Customer service
Computer
DLP (anti-virus and anti-malware)
Ethical Hacking
Equipment Maintenance
Instructing
Installation
Interpersonal
IT
Systems Evaluation
Linux Operating Systems
Management and System Security
Operating Systems
Programming Languages
Repairing
Risk Management Methodologies
Secure Coding practices
Systems Analysis
Technical and Functional
Technology Design
Threat Modeling
Troubleshooting
UNIX
Windows
Writing

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